Book Blog

Book Blog: New Year, New List!!! (2018)

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I’m not sure I have any reading goals for this year, I tried that last year and didn’t complete any of them. So maybe this year I’ll just enjoy the freedom to read and try to remember to post reviews in a timely manner. So far, 2018 is off to a great start!

January

1

  • What Does This Button Do?: An Autobiography by Bruce Dickinson
  • Why We Suck: A Feel Good Guide to Staying Fat, Loud, Lazy and Stupid by Denis Leary
  • Plaid and Plagiarism (The Highland Bookshop, Bk. 2) by Molly MacRae
  • Why We Don’t Suck: And How All of Us Need to Stop Being Such Partisan Little Bitches by Denis Leary
  • Twelve Angry Librarians (Cat in the Stacks, Bk. 8) by Miranda (Dean) James
  • Imprinted by Jim C. Hines
  • The Wrong Dead Guy by Richard Kadrey
  • Scythe by Neal Shusterman
  • Firebrand (Steeplejack Series, Bk.2) by A.J. Hartley
  • Of Murder and Men by Lynn Cahoon
  • Paper Ghosts by Julia Heaberlin

February

1

March.

3

April

2

May

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June

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July

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August

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  • Seduced by Randy Wayne White
  • This Body’s Not Big Enough for Both of Us: A Novel by Edgar Cantero
  • The Middleman: A Novel by Olen Steinhauer
  • Burning Down the Haus: Punk Rock, Revolution, and the Fall of the Berlin Wall (Galley, September 2018) by Tim Mohr
  • Harry Potter and the Cursed Child: Play by J. K. Rowling, Jack Thorne, and John Tiffany
  • Library of Souls by Ransom Riggs
  • The Man Who Came Uptown by George Pelecanos
  • Patient Zero, The Dragon Factory, and The King of Plagues, Assassin’s Code (Joe Ledger, Bks. 1-4) by Jonathan Maberry
  • Guardian (Steeplejack, Bk.3) By A.J. Hartley

September

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October

  • The Ghost and the Bogus Bookseller (Haunted Bookshop, Bk. 6) by Cleo Coyle (aka Alice Kimberly)
  • A Tale of Two Kitties (A Magical Cats Mystery, Bk. 9) by Sofie Kelly
  • Blood Orbit by K.R. Richardson (aka Kat Richardson)
  • Before the Chop IV (and after): LA Weekly Writing (and more) 2012 – 2018 by Henry Rollins
  • Predator One, Kill Switch, and Dogs of War (Joe Ledger, Bks. 7-9) by Jonathan Maberry
  • Much Ado About Muffin (Merry Muffin Mystery, Bk. 4) by Victoria Hamilton
  • The Chalk Man by C.J. Tudor

November

  • You’re On An Airplane: A Self-Mythologizing Memoir by Parker Posey
  • The Lost Night (Galley, February 2019) by Andrea Bartz
  • Two Kinds of Truth by Michael Connelly
  • The Anomaly by Michael Rutger (aka Michael Marshall Smith)
  • The Labyrinth of Spirits (Cemetery of Forgotten Books, Bk. 4) by Carlos Ruiz Zafón
  • Elevation by Stephen King
  • Lightning by Dean Koontz
  • What Happened by Hillary Clinton *Currently Reading*
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Book Blog

Book Blog: Year in Review 2017

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Book blogs are a great resource for recommendations while setting new goals for the upcoming year and/or expand in genres you may feel are lacking. For example, one of my goals this year was to read more non-fiction and poetry. Looking through my list, I don’t think I accomplished that, but there’s always next year.

Here’s a quick review of everything I’ve read in 2017. I will be updating with mini-reviews and comments, so please check back now and then. Happy Reading, Enjoy!

January

1

February

2

March

3

April

4

May

5

June

6

July

7

  • The Second Sister by Claire Kendal
  • A Secret History of Witches by Louisa Morgan
  • The Spy Across the Table by Barry Lancet
  • The Last Hack by Christopher Brookmyre

August

8

September

I spent most of September doing what I have always wanted to do which was completing series. I would start a series and then get sidetracked and/or read a book in a series out of order wishing I had started from the beginning. I’m proud to say I got through two and a half of the four series I’ve wanted to finish for some time.

9

I didn’t finish The Song of Ice & Fire series (yet) because they follow so closely to television show, I kind of got bored. Knowing how something happens can be a blessing and a curse. I will pick it back up, maybe next Summer. Right now, my goal is to finish the Sandman Slim series.

October

Sadly, it was announced recently that author, Sue Grafton, has passed away. According to the message left by her daughter, Jamie, there will be no ghost writer to finish the series, which means, Y is for Yesterday, will be Sue’s final book.

10

November

11

December

I enjoyed every single one of these books, all for various reasons. I’m proud of myself for getting at least one non-fiction book in by years end. It’s hard to find something that will keep your interest, especially if it’s non-fiction and Scott Kelly’s was a great read.

12

I really loved Terminal Alliance and Meddling Kids, I couldn’t put them down. And you can never go wrong with a cozy mystery.

Final Thoughts

Looking through my year in review I count 54 titles, not including the books in the series I finished over the summer. Not bad if I do say so myself. I keep thinking there were more and just didn’t think to include them here. Oh well, there’s always next year!

There are a few titles I am looking forward to reading in 2018, and in no particular order they include… Melanie Benjamin – The Girls in the Picture, Carlos Ruiz Zafón – The Labyrinth of Spirits, John Connolly – The Woman in the Woods, Christopher Moore – Noir, Rose McGowan – Brave, and Robert McCammon – The Listener.

This is my first year in review, so I’m still learning and evolving when it comes to reviews, lists, and layouts. Please leave a comment and let me know what you think, what you’ve read and what you’re looking forward to reading in 2018.

 

Special Collections/Archives

Special Collections Archive Internship Experience (Part 1: Getting Started)

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Last year I had the fantastic opportunity of completing an internship in a special collections archive for my Library and Information Science Practicum. I learned a lot and thought it would be fun to share my experience with others.

I was able to complete onsite visits and interviews of various archives in the city, as well as, processing a collection and creating the collections finding aids for both written and metadata records.

Below you’ll find some of the objectives, activities, readings, and web tutorials that I utilized throughout the process, as well as, a list of onsite interview questions that helped me understand the similarities and differences between each special collection archive.

Game Plan:

Objectives

  • Gain exposure to archive and special collection activities and issues within a variety of institutional contexts.
  • Obtain a broad overview of activities, institution types, and positions in archives and special collections.

Activities

  • Observe reference service interactions in archives and special collections department; participate as required.
  • Observe and participate, as necessary, in collection development, acquisition, and donor relations activities.
  • Arrange and describe a small archival or special collections collection according to institutional guidelines and standards.
  • Create an Encoded Archival Description (EAD) finding aid according to institutional standards.
  • Complete site visits and interviews with area archival and special collection professionals.
  • Complete assigned and elective readings in archival and special collections topics.
  • Attend appropriate department and committee meetings, as identified by supervisor.
  • Participate in digital initiative activities, as appropriate.

Readings:

  • Bradsher, J.G. (1989). Managing Archives and Archival Institutions: Introduction to Archives. Chicago: Univ. of Chicago Press.
  • Daniels, M. and Walch, T. (1984). A Modern Archives Reader: Basic Readings on Archival Theory and Practice. Washington, D.C: National Archives Trust Fund.
  • Greene, M.A. and Meissner, D. (2005). More Product, Less Process: Revamping Traditional Archival Processing. The American Archivist, 68(2), 208-263.
  • O’Toole, J.M. and Cox, R. J. (2006). Understanding Archives & Manuscripts: Archival Fundamentals Series II. Chicago: Society of American Archivists.
  • Olivieri, B. And Mehaffey, A.M. (2015). Interlibrary Loan of Special Collections Materials: An Overview and Case Study. RBM: A Journal of Rare Books, Manuscripts, and Cultural Heritage, 16(2), 113-126.
  • Roe, Kathleen D. (2005). Arranging and Describing Archives and Manuscripts. Chicago: Society of American Archivists.
  • Society of American Archivists. (2013). Describing Archives: A Content Standard (2nd Ed.). Chicago: Society of American Archivists.

Web:

Site Visits and Interviews:

Here’s a list of question provided by my internship supervisor…

  • What is your job title and what do you do?
  • What is the scope of your collection? What do you collect and not collect?
  • What is your parent organization?
  • Who are your primary users? What types of research and reference questions do you receive?
  • What system do you use to manage your collections? Do you use Archivists’ Toolkit, Archives Space, and a homegrown system?  Do you work with a library system?  What are the benefits and challenges of your system?
  • Do you work with born-digital or digitized materials? What type of digital program do you have?
  • What is your educational background? What is your professional history?
  • Why did you decide to enter this profession?
  • What types of preservation and conservation activities do you do?
  • What descriptive standards do you use? Do you use DACS?  Do you create EAD finding aids?
  • What suggestions do you have for someone considering archives and special collections as a career?